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how to stay active through social distancing




Who here has increased their junk food intake as of the last week or so...? Speaking from experience...you are not alone! I have started to wonder what this 2 week hiatus would do for my physical and mental health. After stewing about it for awhile, I came to the following realization:


Why not focus on my health while I have much more time than usual. Like the majority of us, I pretty much have zero excuses to avoid exercising now that time is no longer an obstacle. However, I have found that I do have to find other ways to keep myself motivated and excited to workout since I can no longer attend my usual group workout classes. This is why I have put together this post to remind you why it is so important to keep exercising and how to find resources to make it easier to do so.


First let’s go through the benefits:

Energy

  • I don’t know about you but staying home all day has led to some major dips in my energy. We don’t realize how much stimulation we are surrounded by all day long, whether it be at work or school etc. This is a time when we are forced to slow down both physically and mentally, and I can feel the change.


Mood

  • It’s simple.. exercise = more endorphins released = better mood

  • studies have found moderate exercise to be highly effective against depression and are even calling it an evidence-based treatment option


Cognition

  • another simple equation.. exercise = more blood flow to the brain = more oxygen to the brain = better cognition

  • regular exercise has been shown to increase cognitive function and may even provide resistance against cognitive decline with age


Stress relief

  • exercise can often be an outlet to relieve stress... ever tried boxing!?


Weight management

  • nutrition is another major component to this, but exercise does help with weight management both physically and mentally


Cardiovascular and metabolic health

  • regular exercise has proven time and time again to have a positive effect on our heart and metabolic health

  • this includes preventing high blood pressure, high cholesterol, obesity and diabetes

  • regular exercise can sensitize our cells to insulin and prevent insulin resistance


Bone, joint and muscle health

  • resistance training is highly important to keep our bones strong.. especially as women. When we undergo menopause we endure a decrease in estrogen which predisposes us to osteoporosis (weakening of our bones). Prioritizing exercise throughout our life can be a protective factor and a highly important one at that.


and so much more...

I have looked into a few different resources that seem promising for at home workouts, yoga, meditation and more.


At home workout resources:


Nike Training Club:

  • an app that has various workouts with varying duration and intensity

  • I have used this one and I quite liked it!

  • app: Nike Training Club


Kayla Itsines

  • I have used her workout program before and I really enjoyed it

  • there are various circuits available on her website to try before purchasing her program

  • website: https://www.kaylaitsines.com/


Barry’s Bootcamp:

  • not going to lie I am only familiar with this place because of all the celebrities I follow on Instagram

  • they have been streaming 20 minute workouts on Instagram live… and even better they are equipment free!

  • instagram : @barrys


Studio Tone It up:

  • an app specifically targeted at women who are looking for workout routines

  • they offer a 7 day trial before you are required to commit

  • app: Tone It Up: Workout & Fitness


At home yoga resources:


Glo Yoga

  • a friend recommended glo yoga and so far I am very impressed!

  • they let you do a 15 day trial, is this perfect timing or what!?

  • website: glo.com/yoga-online


Alo Moves

  • not only do they have online yoga, but also fitness classes and mindfulness practice

  • again this is a paid program but they also have free trials

  • website: https://www.alomoves.com/


Yoga Wake Up

  • morning yoga has become something on my to do list and I can’t wait to try this app

  • this app has an alarm clock within it that will wake you up to begin a quick morning yoga routine.. sounds pretty great!

  • app: yoga wake up


Gaia Yoga

  • with lots of selection of yoga & fitness classes as well as guided meditation you can surely find something for you

  • they also offer live events and workshops for their online community

  • another paid program that offers monthly and annual rates


Yoga Girl

  • this website is offering a free 30 day community challenge : 30 days, 30 themes and 30 free yoga classes

  • website: yogagirl.com


Get outside and enjoy nature!

  • as long as we maintain adequate distance from others, why not enjoy the start of spring!?

  • working from home? Walk around the block every hour or two to get some fresh air

  • have to go get groceries? Why not walk there

  • I must say, it is also the perfect temperature for running outdoors


Find a support team!

  • everyone is in the same boat… find friends that will hold you accountable. Try doing the same workout together each day or week. Share your workouts with others via text, phone call, facetime, social media or whatever it is to keep you motivated


we can do this! xo


Sources:

  • Barnes, J. N. (2015). Exercise, cognitive function, and aging. Advances in physiology education, 39(2), 55-62.

  • Chang, Y. K., & Etnier, J. L. (2009). Exploring the dose-response relationship between resistance exercise intensity and cognitive function. Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 31(5), 640-656.

  • Craft, L. L., & Perna, F. M. (2004). The benefits of exercise for the clinically depressed. Primary care companion to the Journal of clinical psychiatry, 6(3), 104.

  • Lavie, C. J., Ozemek, C., Carbone, S., Katzmarzyk, P. T., & Blair, S. N. (2019). Sedentary behavior, exercise, and cardiovascular health. Circulation research, 124(5), 799-815.

  • Mohammadi, M., Siavoshi, H., Naderi, A., Abadi, M. P., & Maleki, M. (2020). A review of cardiac rehabilitation and exercise in cardiovascular disease. Journal of Critical Reviews, 7(1), 182-188.

  • Ploughman, M. (2008). Exercise is brain food: the effects of physical activity on cognitive function. Developmental neurorehabilitation, 11(3), 236-240.

  • Santos, L., Elliott-Sale, K. J., & Sale, C. (2017). Exercise and bone health across the lifespan. Biogerontology, 18(6), 931-946.

  • Schuch, F. B., Vancampfort, D., Richards, J., Rosenbaum, S., Ward, P. B., & Stubbs, B. (2016). Exercise as a treatment for depression: a meta-analysis adjusting for publication bias. Journal of psychiatric research, 77, 42-51.

  • Xu, J., Lombardi, G., Jiao, W., & Banfi, G. (2016). Effects of exercise on bone status in female subjects, from young girls to postmenopausal women: an overview of systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Sports Medicine, 46(8), 1165-1182.

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